Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Author : Abhijeet Shelke, Suhas Mule, Achyut Kannawar, Ramesh Kawade, Dany John,


To evaluate cardiac dysfunctions in patients with chronic liver disease

Suhas Mule, Achyut Kannawar, Ramesh Kawade, Dany John, Abhijeet Shelke

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2022, Volume 9, Issue 7, Pages 4693-4697

Aim: To evaluate cardiac dysfunctions in patients with chronic liver disease.
Material and Methods: The research comprised 100 hospitalised individuals with chronic liver disease. All CLD patients were interviewed and their demographic data, symptoms, and presentation were obtained using a pre-designed structured proforma. Patients who declined to participate in the experiment, on the other hand, were not included. The height, weight, BMI, and belly circumference of each patient were all measured. At the start, vital indicators such as pulse, blood pressure, breathing rate, and SPO2 were collected and recorded. The patients were then subjected to a battery of tests, including a CBC, LFT, RFT, lipid profile, RBS, ascitic fluid analysis, ECG, and 2D ECHO.
Results: Patients without cardiac dysfunction had an average age of 41.69 years, while patients with cardiac dysfunction have an average age of 47.96 years. Cardiac dysfunctions were most common in CLD patients between the ages of 45 -55, with 90% of cases involving males and 10% involving women. When diastolic function was assessed, 75% of patients satisfied two of the three problematic criteria given above, 45% had an enlarged LVMI, and 52% had a larger LA size. All of the measures had a statistically significant link with the severity of CLD (P=0.021). Alcohol was the most common cause of chronic liver disease in both groups of study participants with and without cardiac dysfunction (70%), followed by hepatitis B (10%).
Conclusion: Diastolic dysfunction is the most prevalent aberrant cardiac presentation in chronic liver disease patients. There is no link between the onset of cardiac failure and the cause of chronic liver disease. There is a link between the severity of chronic liver disease and the development of heart dysfunction.