Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Author : A, Banerjee


Effect of CPAP, CPAP with Lifestyle changes and CPAP with Pranayama on Anthropometric evaluation in obese Diabetic subjects with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Shah VK; Badade ZG; Banerjee A; Rai S; More K

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2022, Volume 9, Issue 8, Pages 999-1008

Background: The incidence of OSA among persons who have type 2 diabetes may vary anywhere from 8.5% to 86%. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in people of South Asian heritage who have type 2 diabetes (OSA). People of South Asian descent who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes tend to be overweight, and this obesity has been associated to obstructive sleep apnea. 
Method: In present study 246 subjects received Polysomnography (PSG) and among them 192 assessed for CPAP titration. 78 participants were removed due to inclusion criteria, CPAP intolerance, refusal to participate, those who can't afford treatment, etc. The remaining 114 subjects were obese non-diabetics (61) and obese type 2 diabetics (53). These 53 obese diabetic subjects were divided into 3 groups: CPAP group, CPAP with Lifestyle changes and CPAP with Pranayama group. Follow-up was done after six-month.
Result: We found BMI, Waist Circumference, Hip Circumference and Neck Circumference were decreased in all three-study groups after six months of interventions. It was very highly Significant (p<0.001) in all groups. We have also found a positive correlation with AHI and Anthropometric evaluation.
Conclusion: The pattern of sleep improved across the all-different stages of sleep. Using CPAP in conjunction with these two interventions not only improves the success rate of treating OSA, but also shortens the overall time necessary for therapy.

Effect Of CPAP, CPAP With Lifestyle Changes And CPAP With Pranayama On Sleep Pattern In Obese Diabetic Subjects With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Shah VK; Badade ZG; Banerjee A; Rai S; More K

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2022, Volume 9, Issue 8, Pages 987-998

Background: The prevalence at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 5 or more occurrences per hour was greater in males (9%-38%) than in the general population. The prevalence of this trait rose with age, reaching as high as 90% in males and 78% in women among the elderly. Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated to metabolic dysregulation independent of obesity and OSA, and sleep fragmentation is a major consequence of OSA. 
Method: Inpresent study246 subjects received polysomnography (PSG) and among them 192 assessed for CPAP titration. 78 participants were removed due to inclusion criteria, CPAP intolerance, refusal to participate, those who can't afford treatment, etc. The remaining 114 subjects were 61 obese non-diabetics and 53 obese type 2 diabetics. These 53 obese diabetic subjects were divided into 3 groups: CPAP group, CPAP with Lifestyle changes and CPAP with Pranayama group. Follow-up was done after six-month.
Result: All study groups had lower AHI scores. Sleep efficiency % increased across all trial groups. All research groups' stage I and Stage II sleep % were decreased and demonstrated increase in time in Stage III. All groups experienced more REM sleep, Improved SPO2 % and lower Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores.
Conclusion: The sleep pattern improved across all the different sleep stages. Using CPAP in conjunction with these two interventions not only enhances the success rate of treating OSA, but also shortens the overall time necessary for therapy.