Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : decellularized scaffolds


Abstracts: 5th Annual Congress of the European Society for Translational Medicine (EUSTM-2017), 20–22 October 2017, Berlin, Germany

Aamir Shahzad; Randall J. Cohrs

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2017, Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 48-98

Regenerative medicine is a promising field with the potential to overcome the increasing need for donor organs either by stopping disease progression (e.g. with cells, genes or biologics) or by providing novel organ options. Furthermore, regenerative medicine strategies are unlike other treatments in that they are meant to persevere and treat the underlying injury rather than symptoms. This requires a level of persistence and safety and long term efficacy not always previously required for new therapies. In the past decade, clinicians have been able to utilize cell and gene therapies in unprecedented numbers, but with mixed results. At the same time, scientists have engineered organs (bladder, esophagus and blood vessels) that are considered simple structurally and functionally. However, regenerative medicine is yet to fully succeed with cells or genes or to fabricate fully functional solid organs such as kidneys, livers, lungs, and hearts. Yet, development of organs in the laboratory is proceeding both via 3D printing and use of decellularized scaffolds