Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : Allergic rhinitis


Allergic Rhinitis in Relation to Gut Microbiota Composition among School-Aged Patients

Samir Sourour, Mahmoud Diab, Rania M. Amer , Tarek Abdelmouty, Gehan A. Elshenawy, Saeid Abdelmonaem

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2021, Volume 8, Issue 4, Pages 457-465

Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most globally commondiseases and
usually persists throughout life. First-line drugs can be successfully used to control
AR. However, once these medications are terminated, the majority of AR patients
will reappear the symptoms of AR within a brief period. Thus, these medications do
not appear to exert a long-term effect on the baseline Total Nasal Symptom
Score.To study the relationship between the gut microbiota types and allergic
rhinitis. Patients and Methods: This case control study was carried out on 52
school-aged patients presented at Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck (ORLHNS)
Department and Microbiology and Immunology department at Zagazig
University. The patients were classified into 2 groups: Allergic rhinitis group: 26
individuals with allergic rhinitis Control group: 26 individuals without allergic
rhinitis. All patients in this study were subjected to the personal history taking,
physical examination and laboratory investigations including: eosinophilic count,
skin prick tests (SPT) for common perennial and seasonal allergens, measurement
of (total Ig E) and identifing bacteria (lactobacillus and bacteroides) by SYBR
Green real time PCR. Results: Age was distributed as 11.19±3.26 and 11.65±3.24
respectively between case and control with no significant difference between
groups. Mean disease duration was 6.15±2.01, the majority were Intermittent and
mild regard classification also the majority were trigger by inhalation. Skin prick
test among cases group showed majority were house dust and date palm pollens.
Absolute eosinophils counting was significantly higher among cases compared to
control one. Cases were significantly higher regard IgE distribution. Lactic acid
bacteria RNA was significantly higher among control group compared to cases
group while Bacteroid bacteria RNA was significantly higher among cases group
compared to control group. Conclusion: Lactic acid bacteria in gut microbiota of
school-aged individuals may influence sensitization to different allergens.

Assessment Of Risk Factors For The Development Of Allergic Diseases In Children

Nurmamatova Kurbonoy Choriyevna; Abdashimov Zafar Bahtiyarovich; Karimova Mukhabat Umarovna; Stojarova Nelli Kamilovna; Tangirov Abdixoliq Lolayevich

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2021, Volume 8, Issue 2, Pages 319-329

Allergy is a pathology of countries with a high index of socio-economic development and most of all residents of large cities. By 2025, according to the WHO, 50% of the world's population will suffer from allergies [14]. This article examines the main risk factors for the development of allergic diseases in children under the age of 18 in Tashkent. The most significant factors were: the presence of an inherited predisposition on the line of one (RCh 1.9) or both parents (OR 5.6), closely related marriages between parents (RCh 2.8), the age of parents over 40 at the time of conception of the child (RCh 1.4) and some others.

Influence of mouth breathing on oral health in children: A population-based crosssectional study in Nagpur city

Dr. Arunkumar Sajjanar; Dr. Nilesh Rojekar; Dr. Pankaj Chavan; Dr. Milind Wasnik; Dr. Niharika Gahlod; Dr. Harshita Shukla

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 11, Pages 7652-7659

Background/purpose
Previous studies have suggested that mouth breathing has harmful effects on oral health in
children, but the evidence has been insufficient. To investigate the association of mouth
breathing with oral health in school children aged 8–11 years from Nagpur city , India
Materials and methods
Cross-sectional data were obtained from March to April 2019. A questionnaire was used to
investigate children's mouth breathing habits and personal/family histories related to allergic
disease. Oral health status was determined through a clinical oral examination. Data were
analyzed with multivariable logistic regression.
Results
In total, 1007 children were included. We observed no association between mouth breathing
and dental caries in children. However mouth breathing was associated with child's tonsillitis
and was identified as a possible risk factor for class II dental malocclusion.