Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : Orthodontic


VARIOUS METHODS OF EXTRUSION OF TOOTH

T Tandra Das; Pradeep Solete

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2021, Volume 8, Issue 3, Pages 2322-2330

1.1 Aim:To assess the various methods of extrusion of tooth
1.2 Objective:To assess different applications of extrusion in every aspect of
operative treatment. Extrusion is widely used in orthodontic therapy, This article
focuses on the use of extrusion in other aspects as well.
1.3 Background:Introduction For many years, the removal of bone or gingival
tissues has been the most common method used for crown-lengthening surgery.
This surgical procedure usually causes an uneven contour of the gingival margin
in the anterior region. In addition, as fear of pain is one of the major problems in
dentistry, patients often reject this traumatic surgery. In recent years, as an
alternative to such a highly invasive technique, mini screws have been used as
temporary anchorage devices (TAD) for several orthodontic tooth movements
including forced eruption. However, there are other methods developed in recent
years.
1.4 Reason:Hence, this comprehensive literature review aims at understanding the
various methods of extrusion of teeth.

Effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues

Dr.Kishor B. Bagalkot; Dr. Akshay M. Dhewale; Dr. PiyushGupta; Dr.KavudaNagarjuna Prasad; Dr.Anjali Pawan Kumar; Dr.Faizan Ali Lone

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 11, Pages 5916-5921

Background:Orthodontic forces are often followed by the biological response of dental pulp.
The present study was conducted to assess effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues.
Materials & Methods: 58 patients required maxillary first premolar extraction for orthodontic
purposes were treated with a cantilever spring made of 16 × 22 steel wire to apply intrusive
force to upper first premolars (Group I) and the opposing teeth were considered as control
group (Group II).
Results: Inflammation at 7 days in group I was none seen in 60% and mild in 40% 34% and in
group II was none seen in 80% and mild in 20%. At 1 month was none seen in 100% in both
groups. Fibrous tissue at 7 days was none seen in 100% teeth in both groups and at 1 month
was none seen in 40% in group I and 100% in group II and mild in 60% in group II. Vascular
dilatation at 7 days was none seen in 60% and moderate in 40% in group I and none in 55%
and moderate in 45% in group II. Vascular dilatation at 1 month was none in 60% and mild in
40% in both groups. The difference was significant (P< 0.05).
Conclusion: Mild intrusive force in closed apex teeth causes no significant histologic changes
in both groups

Effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues.

Gayatri Mago; Aswathy Krishna; Dr. Madhushree M; Ankur Chauhan; Vishal Kumar Sharma; Ritika Jain

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 11, Pages 8328-8332

Background: The relation between orthodontic force application and dental pulp tissue has been the subject of studies in the recent years. The present study was conducted to evaluate effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues. Materials & Methods: 50 patients required maxillary first premolar extraction for orthodontic treatment were included in the study. A cantilever spring made of 16 × 22 steel wire was used to apply intrusive force to upper first premolars (Group I) and the opposing teeth were considered as control group (Group II). Histologic changes were compared between the control and intrusive groups after 7 days and 1 month. Results: Inflammation at 7 days in group I was none seen in 70% and mild in 30% and in group II was none seen in 80% and mild in 20%. At 1 month was none seen in 100% in both groups. Fibrous tissue at 7 days was none seen in 100% teeth in both groups and at 1 month was none seen in 38% in group I and 100% in group II and mild in 62% in group II. Vascular dilatation at 7 days was none seen in 62% and moderate in 38% in group I and none in 60% and moderate in 40% in group II. Vascular dilatation at 1 month was none in 60% and mild in 40% in both groups. The difference was significant (P< 0.05). Conclusion: There was no obvious histologic changes in pup resulted from mild intrusive force in both groups

Assessment of clinical success of Miniscrew Implants for Orthodontic Treatment: An observational study

Aditi Tak, Aswathy Krishna, Madhushree M, Ramanpreet Kaur, Ramiz Raja Mallick, Padam Singh

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 11, Pages 8914-8917

Background: Mini-screw implants are a compliance-free alternative to more traditional
forms of incisor intrusion. Hence; the present study was undertaken for assessing the clinical
success of Miniscrew Implants for Orthodontic Treatment.Materials & methods:The present
study was undertaken for assessing the clinical success of Miniscrew Implants for
Orthodontic Treatment. A total of 30 patients scheduled to undergo mini-screw implants as a
part of orthodontic treatment were enrolled. Complete demographic details of all the patients
were obtained. A Performa was made and thorough details of the clinical examination of all
the patients were recorded. All the surgical procedures were carried out under adequate septic
conditions. All the patients were recalled on follow-up and success rate was assessed.
Results:Maxillary arch was involved in 70 percent of the patients. In the present study,
clinical success rate of mini-screw implants was 96.67 percent. Significant results were
obtained while comparing the success rate and failure rate. Conclusion: Miniscrew Implants
for Orthodontic Treatment are accompanied by high success rate.