Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : Healthcare


Analyzing Diabetic Data Using Naive-Bayes Classifier

A. Sharmila Agnal; E. Saraswathi

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 4, Pages 2687-2699

Approximately 422 million people across the world have diabetes, particularly in countries where the average income is in the middle and lower end of the economic spectrum. Statistics reveal that every year, about 1.6 million deaths are recorded which can be directly attributed to diabetes. The graph suggests that number of cases as well as the prevalence of diabetes have been steadily incrementing over the past few decades. Through this new implementation of the Bayesian Classifier, raw medical data is analyzed and the risk of diabetes diagnosis based on each patient’s medical information can be calculated. The raw data is converted into class labels and the likelihood of a positive potential diabetes case is derived, as a probability (≤1). This can not only be used by healthcare professionals but also by common users, and can be useful in detecting the risk and preventing it in time without taking any medical tests. This classifier uses very basic information that would be known to each patient or can easily be obtained.

Understanding Clinical Waste Management and the Risk of Cross-Contamination Diseases in Malaysian Public Healthcare Facilities

Marziah Zahar; Fauzuradhi Fazir

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 2, Pages 3926-3937

Clinical waste management in the hospital plays a considerable role in healthcare facilities, as it serves as the frontline that deals with clinical disposal, where zero cross-contamination exposure to the public must be ensured. In this paper, a preliminary study was conducted to investigate the biohazard container etiquette in a selected Malaysian healthcare facility. The yellow bin is a designated container used to dispose of contaminated clinical waste that could spread pathogenic microorganisms to humans. The findings show that several biohazard bins were positioned in non-restricted pathways containing general plastic, papers, and rejected medical parts. It is assumed that a lot of effort is required to educate both the public and the staff regarding biohazard bin etiquette. To date, more inspections are still being conducted to determine the impact of misusing the biohazard bin. Nevertheless, the authors are currently developing descriptive statistics to investigate the public awareness of biohazard bin etiquette in hospitals. A new strategy to improve clinical waste management sustainability in a healthcare facility is also being proposed