Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : elevated blood pressure


A study on prevalence of elevated blood pressure and hypertension among healthy school children at an altitude of 4000-5000 feet

Dr. Divyabh Gehlot, Dr. Neelam Grover, Dr. Hemant Gupta, Dr. Rajeev Vinayak, Dr. Amudeep Singh

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2022, Volume 9, Issue 2, Pages 430-437

Introduction: Early diagnosis of hypertension is an important strategy in its control which is usually
missed in OPD practice. Kumarhatti, Solan, was selected as the place of study based on the new AAP
2017 criteria to find the prevalence of elevated blood pressure and hypertension at an altitude of 4000-
5000 feet.
Objective: To measure blood pressure of school going children and to classify BP measurements into
normal BP, Elevated BP and Hypertension.
Methods: 600 children between 10 to 17 years of age were selected from urban and rural schools. The
final diagnosis of HTN was made if a child or adolescent had auscultatory confirmed BP readings
≥95thpercentile on 3 different visits. Data collected was analyzed using SPSS20.
Results: Prevalence of EBP, stage 1 and stage 2 hypertension was found to be 15, 8%, 4.5% and 1%
respectively in the study. Prevalence of EBP and stage 1 hypertension was higher in urban population
(17.2% and 5.3% respectively) whereas stage 2 hypertension was almost equal in both population
(P<0.05). Prevalence of EBP, stage 1 and stage 2 hypertension was maximum in obese category as
38.6%, 13.63%, 6.8% followed by overweight 24%, 11.25%, 2.5% respectively (P<0.05). The prevalence
of positive family history among study subjects was 15% (N=90) with P value<0.05.
Conclusion: Prevalence of hypertension was 5.5% in the study subjects. Prevalence of EBP and stage 1
hypertension was higher in urban population. Our study revealed that prevalence of elevated blood
pressure and hypertension was significantly more in overweight and obese children and with positive
family history compared to normal children proving obesity and positive family history as an important
risk factor for hypertension in children.