Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : factors influencing


Factors influencing the respiratory support in low birth weight neonates: A clinical study in tertiary care teaching hospital

Dr. Amritesh Ranjan, Dr. Kumar Gaurav, Dr.Ankita Ranjan, Dr.Arunima

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2022, Volume 9, Issue 7, Pages 3664-3671

Background: Deficiency of pulmonary surfactant is one of the most important factors contributing to the development of respiratory RDS [1]. In immature lungs, the elevated surface tension resulting from surfactant deficiency leads to alveolar collapse at the end of expiration, atelectasis, uneven inflation and regional alveolar over distension. Improved use of antenatal steroids, labour room CPAP, trial of CPAP before intubation and caffeine have changed the way a preterm baby with RDS is managed in the last decade. Many babies with RDS who used to receive prophylactic or early rescue surfactant are now managed with CPAP alone, others are administered surfactant only if they fail CPAP. But, in this process of trial of CPAP, a few babies receive surfactant as “late rescue” after few hours of trial of CPAP. Objective: To evaluate factors determining long duration of respiratory support (CPAP/ventilation > 120 hours) in VLBW babies in Indian NICU.
Aims and Objectives: To evaluate factors determining long duration of respiratory support (CPAP/ventilation > 120 hours) in VLBW babies in Indian NICU.
Material and Methods: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted at RDJM Medical College, Muzaffarpur, Bihar, India from October 2021 to September 2022. All legally viable preterm babies < 32 weeks and < 1500 grams (inborn or out born admitted within 2 hours of birth) were included in the study. A total of 50 Babies were included in the study.
Results and Observations: Out of 50 babies 9 babies were excluded from analysis due to major malformation in 6 and referral of 3 cases. A definite association was noted between gestation (86% of<28 weeks 46% of 29-30, 18% of 31-32 weeks babies, p=0.02) and long duration of respiratory support. Boys vs girls (61% vs 32%, p=0.06), babies born after spontaneous labor vs delivery for maternal/fetal reasons (67% vs 32%, P0.06) were likely to require long duration of respiratory support