Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : Maxillary sinus


TREATMENT OPTIMIZATION OF CHRONIC ODONTOGENIC MAXILLARY SINUSITIS

Shavkat AMONOV; Durdona ALIMOVA; Firuza NURMUKHAMEDOVA; Khusan UMAROV; Kudrat SALOMOV

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 2, Pages 2419-2422

Abstract: The article describes odontogenic maxillary sinusitis that occurs in diseases of
the teeth or upper jaw. The main reasons for its occurrence have been given: foreign
bodies such as splinters, roots of teeth embedded in the maxillary sinus during their
removal, filling material brought into the sinus, dental implants that have migrated to its
cavity. Today's methods of treatment of chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are
described. A large number of studies have been devoted to the problem of odontogenic
sinusitis. However, the treatment and diagnostic tactics of otorhinolaryngologist and
dentist at this form of nosological pathology is not determined. The presented data testify to
expediency of the correct approach to treatment of patients with chronic odontogenic
sinusitis.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF ANATOMY FOR THE DENTAL IMPLANTS.

Dr.RaghavendraJayesh MDS; Divirath Ramakrishnan

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 3, Pages 2058-2067

Implant Surgeon Gary Greenstein,* † John Cavallaro,* ‡ and Dennis Tarnow* § A proficient knowledge of oral anatomy is needed to provide effective implant dentistry. This article addresses basic ana- tomic structures relevant to the dental implantologist. Pertinent muscles, blood supply, foramen, and nerve innervations that may be encountered during implant procedures are reviewed. Caution must be exercised when performing surgery in certain regions of the mouth. Furthermore, numerous suggestions are provided regarding the practical application of anatomy to facilitate successful implant therapy Review Practical Application of Anatomy for the Dental Implant Surgeon Gary Greenstein,* † John Cavallaro,* ‡ and Dennis Tarnow* § A proficient knowledge of oral anatomy is needed to provide effective implant dentistry. This article addresses basic ana- tomic structures relevant to the dental implantologist. Pertinent muscles, blood supply, foramen, and nerve innervations that may be encountered during implant procedures are reviewed. Caution must be exercised when performing surgery in certain regions of the mouth. Furthermore, numerous suggestions are provided regarding the practical application of anatomy to facilitate successful implant therapy Review 
Practical Application of Anatomy for the Dental Implant Surgeon Gary Greenstein,* † John Cavallaro,* ‡ and Dennis Tarnow* § A proficient knowledge of oral anatomy is needed to provide effective implant dentistry. This article addresses basic ana- tomic structures relevant to the dental implantologist. Pertinent muscles, blood supply, foramen, and nerve innervations that may be encountered during implant procedures are reviewed. Caution must be exercised when performing surgery in certain regions of the mouth. Furthermore, numerous suggestions are provided regarding the practical application of anatomy to facilitate successful implant therapy
A proficient knowledge of oral anatomy is needed to provide effective implant dentistry. This article addresses basic anatomic structures relevant to the dental implantologist. Pertinent muscles, blood supply, foramen, and nerve innervations that may be encountered during implant procedures are reviewed. Caution must be exercised when performing surgery in certain regions of the mouth. Furthermore, numerous suggestions are provided regarding the practical application of anatomy to facilitate successful implant therapy.

Evaluating the effect of intentional perforation of dental implants into the maxillary sinus in different depths (Stability andRadiographicalstudy)

Evan Namrud Youhanna; Shehab Ahmad Hamad; Luqman Fawzi Omar

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 1, Pages 4359-4383

The sinus membrane perforationcombined withexposing dental implant into the maxillary sinus is considered as a potential risk factor for implant failure and sinus complication.The present studyinvestigated the incidence of intentional sinus membrane perforation by dental implant in different depths and the possible risk factors associated with membrane perforations and assessed the implant osseointegratin and the survival rate of implants placed in the posterior maxillain a dog model. A total of 32 titanium implants were placed in the bilateral maxillary first molar areas of 16 adult mongrel dogs with different penetrating depths of implants into the maxillary sinus cavities (group A: 0 mm; group B: 1 mm; group C: 2mm; group D: 3 mm). The sample, block biopsies were harvested six months after surgery and evaluated by Biomechanical analysisandradiographic observation.After six months healing period, no signs of inflammatory reactions or complications were observed in any maxillary sinus of the sixteen doges. The results showed that the posterior maxillary edentulous areas with reduced bone height may be successfully rehabilitated with implants that penetrate the Schneiderian membrane and extended into the maxillary antrum. During the 6-monthes observational period in canines, despite the different protrusion extent, penetration of dental implant into the maxillary sinus with membrane perforation did not compromise the dental implant osseointegation processes and the sinus health. It was also found out when penetrating depth into the sinus is less than 2 mm, the apical portion of implant could be re-covered by regenerating membrane.No significant differences were found among groups regarding implant stability, bone-to-implant contact (BIG) and bone area in the implant threads (BA). In conclusion, invading the maxillary sinus by dental implant is not necessarily associated with significant complications as was generally expected, and stable osseointegrated dental implant that perforate the sinus without apparent immediate complication cannot be considered a harmful factors that necessitate its immediate removal, so could be left provided that they were initially stable.