Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : Skeletal malocclusion


Evaluation Of Relapse In Orthognathic Surgery: An Original Research

Dr. Bharti; Dr. Kunal Mohindru; Dr Vikranth Shetty; Dr Shilpa Sunil Khanna; Dr. Inderjit Murugendrappa Gowdar; Dr. Rahul VC Tiwari; Dr. Heena Tiwari

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 8, Pages 3210-3215

Aim: The present study was conducted to analyse the stability of outcomes achieved by surgical treatment of skeletal class III patients in terms of the rate and extent of relapses with the help of cephalogram. Methodology: A total of 11 patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery were included. The primary inclusion criterion was a skeletal class III treated by SSO surgery combined with maxillary advancement (Le Fort I) surgery. Analysis was based on three postoperative cephalograms per patient. Results: We observed relapse (defined, in accordance with Proffit, as changes >2 mm or 2°) at a rate of 24% after SSO surgery. We noted a maxillary relapse in 6 of the 11 patients who had undergone Le Fort I surgery, with SNA values initially increasing by +3° from T0 and T1 in keeping with the advancement procedure and subsequently decreasing by −1° toward baseline yielding a relapse rate of 30%. Conclusion: The majority of patients exhibited stable treatment outcomes. As with all surgical procedures, success demands of the surgeon an intimate knowledge and understanding of physiology and anatomy.

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF SOFT- TISSUE CHIN COMPENSATION IN SKELETAL CLASS I AND CLASS III MALOCCLUSION

Akriti Tiwari; Ravindra Kumar Jain; Remmiya Mary Varghese

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 1, Pages 1873-1878

Soft tissue analysis is integral for patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Both hard and soft tissues must be considered for harmonious facial esthetics and optimal occlusion. As there has been the latest paradigm shift from hard tissue to soft tissue and how it is affected in treatment. Visualizing only the hard tissues alone, i.e., the teeth and jaws in terms of discrepancy posed a problem which could be easily tackled in a direct manner to achieve ideal values. But soft tissue drape compounded the problem. This is due to the variability in soft tissue thickness covering the teeth and bone. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare soft tissue thickness in skeletal class I and class III pattern Materials and methodology-This was a retrospective study based on a university-setting wherein the lateral cephalograms of the patients who had visited saveetha dental college and hospital were retrieved. The total sample consisted of 20 lateral cephalograms. Independent t-test was carried out to evaluate soft-tissue chin thickness difference between skeletal class I and class III. Chi-square test was done to evaluate gender association. The significance level for the p-value was set at 0.05. Independent T-test reported that there was a statistically significant soft-tissue chin thickness observed between skeletal class I and class III (p=0.02, p<0.05). Chi-square test indicated that there was a statistically significant association observed in gender (p=0.012, p<0.05) Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there was a significant soft-tissue chin thickness observed between skeletal class I and class III. There was a statistically significant association of soft tissue chin thickness at Pog in both males and females.