Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : mortality


The effect of body mass index (BMI) on the mortality among patients with stroke

Salah Elsayed, Muath Othman

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2021, Volume 8, Issue 4, Pages 181-186

Stroke is considered one of the leading causesof morbidity and mortality in many
countries. Many studies investigated the outcomes after the occurrence of stroke.
Some of those research studies indicated that obesity and the increasein the
bodymass index areestablished risk factors for mortality among stroke patients.
However, the results of these studies were inconsistent.The main aim of this review
article was to examine the association between bodymass index and mortality
among stroke patients. The majority of the studies had shown a possible effect of
overweight on mortality among stroke patients; the evidence regarding the
association's presence is limited.On the other hand, the majority of the studies had
shown a protective effect of obesity (mild obesity, bodymass index between 30-35)
onreducingthe risk of mortality among stroke patients. This means underweight
stroke patients have more risk of mortality. Thus, the argument regarding the effect
of high bodymass index on mortality has been explained by the obesity paradox.
However, most of those studies were observational, and results could be attributed
to the methodological flaw. There is a need to well-designed prospective studies that
to overcome the limitation of the previous studies.

Molecular Diagnostic Methods For Viral Infections

Dhakshinya M; Smiline Girija A.S; Ezhilarasan D

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 1, Pages 2595-2605

Viral diagnostic tests are categorized as direct diagnosis, indirect examination (virus isolation), and serology. Molecular testing is often done to detect potent viral markers resulting from any gene or chromosomal modifications during viral replication in the host. The clinical specimen is tested specifically in direct analysis for the presence of virus particles, virus antigens or viral nucleic acids. Molecular diagnosis of viruses can be achieved from clinical samples like blood, hair, skin, amniotic fluid, or other tissue. Molecular biology techniques are considered to be the standard and confirmatory protocols in the analysis of viral DNA, RNA and protein. Molecular viral diagnosis are considered to be more specific and sensitive in preliminary viral screening and can pave the way for rapid diagnosis. However, the procedures are costly and involve automated bio-instruments to perform the same. This review thus highlights the various molecular diagnostic methods used in diagnostic virology with their limitations and challenges.