Online ISSN: 2515-8260

Keywords : Pulp


DIFFERENT OBTURATING TECHNIQUES USED IN PRIMARY TEETH: A REVIEW

Dr Pankaj Chavhan; Dr Yogesh Somvanshi; Dr Suryakant Kumar; Dr.Grishmi Niswade; Dr Arun Sajjanar; Dr. Nilesh Rojekar; Dr. Vaidehi Awari; Dr. Anand Deo

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2021, Volume 8, Issue 3, Pages 958-965

Primary teeth maintain the arch length and form by maintaining proper guidance for permanent teeth. Pulpectomy is the one of the treatment option available to preserve the tooth and thus helps in maintaining normal space maintainers. Other objectives of preserving primary teeth are to enhance esthetics and mastication, prevent aberrant tongue habits, aid in speech, and prevent the psychological effects associated with tooth loss. Obturation with hermatic seal is the key for long term success of pulpectomy. Obturationtechnique that fulfill criteria’s for perfect obturation should be given emphasis. However different obturation techniques give different outcomes. Hence the purpose of this article is to throw light on different obturation technique with their comparison with each
other.

Effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues

Dr.Kishor B. Bagalkot; Dr. Akshay M. Dhewale; Dr. PiyushGupta; Dr.KavudaNagarjuna Prasad; Dr.Anjali Pawan Kumar; Dr.Faizan Ali Lone

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 11, Pages 5916-5921

Background:Orthodontic forces are often followed by the biological response of dental pulp.
The present study was conducted to assess effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues.
Materials & Methods: 58 patients required maxillary first premolar extraction for orthodontic
purposes were treated with a cantilever spring made of 16 × 22 steel wire to apply intrusive
force to upper first premolars (Group I) and the opposing teeth were considered as control
group (Group II).
Results: Inflammation at 7 days in group I was none seen in 60% and mild in 40% 34% and in
group II was none seen in 80% and mild in 20%. At 1 month was none seen in 100% in both
groups. Fibrous tissue at 7 days was none seen in 100% teeth in both groups and at 1 month
was none seen in 40% in group I and 100% in group II and mild in 60% in group II. Vascular
dilatation at 7 days was none seen in 60% and moderate in 40% in group I and none in 55%
and moderate in 45% in group II. Vascular dilatation at 1 month was none in 60% and mild in
40% in both groups. The difference was significant (P< 0.05).
Conclusion: Mild intrusive force in closed apex teeth causes no significant histologic changes
in both groups

Effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues.

Gayatri Mago; Aswathy Krishna; Dr. Madhushree M; Ankur Chauhan; Vishal Kumar Sharma; Ritika Jain

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 11, Pages 8328-8332

Background: The relation between orthodontic force application and dental pulp tissue has been the subject of studies in the recent years. The present study was conducted to evaluate effect of orthodontic forces on pulp tissues. Materials & Methods: 50 patients required maxillary first premolar extraction for orthodontic treatment were included in the study. A cantilever spring made of 16 × 22 steel wire was used to apply intrusive force to upper first premolars (Group I) and the opposing teeth were considered as control group (Group II). Histologic changes were compared between the control and intrusive groups after 7 days and 1 month. Results: Inflammation at 7 days in group I was none seen in 70% and mild in 30% and in group II was none seen in 80% and mild in 20%. At 1 month was none seen in 100% in both groups. Fibrous tissue at 7 days was none seen in 100% teeth in both groups and at 1 month was none seen in 38% in group I and 100% in group II and mild in 62% in group II. Vascular dilatation at 7 days was none seen in 62% and moderate in 38% in group I and none in 60% and moderate in 40% in group II. Vascular dilatation at 1 month was none in 60% and mild in 40% in both groups. The difference was significant (P< 0.05). Conclusion: There was no obvious histologic changes in pup resulted from mild intrusive force in both groups

Radicular Pulp Therapy for the Primary Dentition

Dr. Sanat Kumar Bhuyan; Dr. Ruchi Bhuyan; Akankshya Sahu; Abhisek pati; Sidhant Bhuyan

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine, 2020, Volume 7, Issue 6, Pages 1183-1189

Objective: The aim of this research was to screening the radicular pulp therapy for the primary teeth. Materials and methods: There were two different clinical procedures were used in this study one was single visit and another one was multiple visits. Out of those two single visits was more preferable. Various methods were also used to determine the working length of the teeth. Results: We found normal and healthy soft tissue after the treatment. No pathologic resorption associated with bone rare fraction also seen. Radiographic treatment was successful without evidence of bone reabsorption and no periapical radiolucency formation postoperatively. Conclusions: Pulpectomy is meant to protect the main teeth that are missing. The pulpectomy technique consists of debridging and widening canals with graded files in advance of shuttering.